CA Tests

Dual Plane Interferometry

Description: This experiment aims to measure gravitational redshift using a fixed position setup with two arms: horizontal and vertical. By comparing signal transmission through different media along these paths, the effects of gravitational acceleration on signal propagation can be assessed

Setup: The experiment utilizes a fixed platform with two arms extending horizontally and vertically from a central point. Energy sources and detectors are positioned at the ends of each arm, ensuring a consistent distance between them throughout the experiment.

Energy Emission: A single signal is emitted simultaneously from the central source by being split into two paths, each using an identical length of coaxial cable, one along the horizontal arm and the other along the vertical arm.

Energy Transmission: At the end of each arm the signal is converted to an EM signal to be propagated back to the central point by an identical method in each path which leaves it propagation open to the ε0 μ0 field.

Energy Detection: At the center of each arm, detectors measure the received signals. To ensure accurate measurements, the time taken for energy to traverse each path is precisely referenced using interferometers.

Expected results: The “free space” signal traversing the vertical path shows frequency shift indicating a gravitational redshift or blueshift, depending on the direction of the signal flow, due to changes in gravitational potential energy (as seen by Pound-Rebka). The “free space” signal traversing the horizontal path will exhibit minimal frequency shift, as the impedance remains constant due to the lack of gravitational variations. The control or reference signal traveling in the coaxial cable will be unchanged in either case.

Analysis: By comparing the observed frequency shifts between the horizontal and vertical arms, the impact of gravitational acceleration on signal propagation can be quantified. Any differences in frequency shift between the two paths will provide insights into the gravitational effects on signal transmission through different media.

Measurement of Gravitational Redshift and Y0 Field Contours Using James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Atomic Clocks

Description: This experiment aims to investigate the gravitational redshift phenomenon and variations in Y0 field gradients by utilizing the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and atomic clocks. The JWST, equipped with high-precision instruments, provides an ideal platform for observing redshift effects in distant celestial objects. By correlating these observations with time measurements from atomic clocks placed at different positions on Earth and in space, we can discern the influence of gravitational fields and Y0 field gradients on both time and energy propagation.

Objective: The primary objective of this experiment is to quantify the gravitational redshift effects observed by the JWST and investigate any correlations with variations in Y0 field gradients. By synchronizing observations from the JWST with precise time measurements from atomic clocks, we aim to elucidate the interplay between gravitational fields, Y0 field gradients, time dilation, and energy propagation in the cosmos.

Setup: The experimental setup involves coordinating observations with the JWST, which captures high-resolution images and spectra of distant astronomical objects. Simultaneously, multiple atomic clocks are deployed at various locations on Earth and in space, including Lagrange points and other strategic positions. These clocks are synchronized initially to ensure accurate time measurements. Additionally, the frequencies of atomic clocks are adjusted to account for variations in vacuum permittivity (ε0) and permeability (μ0) at different altitudes, which affect their electromagnetic resonators used for time reference.

Data Collection: Data acquisition entails recording redshift observations from the JWST along with corresponding time measurements from the atomic clocks. Observations are conducted over extended periods to capture variations in redshift and time discrepancies under different gravitational and Y0 field gradient conditions.

Data Analysis: The collected data undergoes comprehensive analysis, wherein statistical methods and mathematical models are employed to discern patterns, correlations, and anomalies. By correlating redshift observations with time differentials from atomic clocks and variations in Y0 field gradients, we aim to quantify the gravitational effects and Y0 field influences on both time and energy propagation.

Expected Outcomes: It is anticipated that the experimental results will reveal measurable gravitational redshift effects observed by the JWST, corroborated by time differentials from atomic clocks. Furthermore, variations in Y0 field gradients may manifest as deviations in redshift patterns, providing insights into the underlying dynamics of space-time, Y0 fields, and energy propagation.

Conclusion: Upon completion of the experiment and subsequent data analysis, the findings are expected to provide valuable insights into the gravitational redshift phenomenon, variations in Y0 field gradients, and their interrelationships. By combining observations from the JWST with precise time measurements from atomic clocks, we can advance our understanding of fundamental principles in astrophysics, theoretical physics, and the nature of space-time, paving the way for future research in cosmology and space exploration.

Splitting of Photon to Detect and Prove Anti-Electrons

Description: While the photon undergoes spontaneous disintegration trillions of times per second throughout the cosmos, there has been a notable absence of formal experimentation aimed at delineating this process and validating the elemental constituents of the photon. This phenomenon is commonly observed in the operation of antennas, wherein electromagnetic wave charge pairs are partitioned into equal energy poles for subsequent detection and analysis. The corroboration of this split is evidenced by the subsequent processing of energy through transformers, which exhibit the capacity to exclusively handle flux fields of equidistant and opposing polarities, failing otherwise and becoming saturated.

Objective: The primary objective of this experiment is to meticulously measure and delineate the individual currents associated with both electrons and their corresponding anti-charges, commonly referred to as positrons.

Setup: The experimental setup entails the utilization of both photomultipliers and anti-photomultipliers, akin to those employed in mass spectrometry apparatus, to meticulously gauge and differentiate the currents stemming from balanced electrons and anti-electron pairs. These pairs are subdivided utilizing impedance gradient detectors, enabling the isolation and characterization of the constituent particles.

Data Collection: Data acquisition involves the precise measurement and recording of the currents obtained from both the electron and anti-charge streams utilizing the designated photomultipliers and anti-photomultipliers. The collected data is meticulously cataloged and tabulated for subsequent analysis.

Data Analysis: The gathered data undergoes comprehensive analysis, wherein statistical methods and mathematical models are employed to discern patterns, correlations, and anomalies within the currents of electrons and anti-charges. Additionally, comparative analyses are conducted to ascertain any discernible differences or similarities between the two streams.

Expected Outcomes: It is anticipated that the experimental results will reveal distinct and measurable currents corresponding to both electrons and anti-charges. Furthermore, the data is expected to elucidate the characteristic properties and behaviors of these fundamental particles, shedding light on their individual dynamics and interactions.

Conclusions: Upon completion of the experiment and subsequent data analysis, the findings are expected to provide valuable insights into the nature and behavior of electrons and their anti-charges within the context of photon disintegration. These insights may have significant implications for our understanding of particle physics and the fundamental constituents of electromagnetic radiation.

The revelation that both charge polarities are detected when using a single photon would mark a profound advancement in our understanding of quantum mechanics. This discovery challenges conventional notions and opens new avenues for research and application in particle physics, quantum computing, and communication. It necessitates a paradigm shift in theoretical frameworks, promising groundbreaking insights into the fundamental nature of quantum phenomena and their implications for future technologies.

Measurement of Y0 Field Contours, Orientation, and Polarization Using Atomic Ressonnce

Objective: To investigate the variations in the Y0 field contours, orientation, and polarization by measuring time discrepancies among atomic clocks placed at different positions

Setup: Select multiple atomic clocks with high precision and accuracy. Set up a controlled environment where the gravitational field, temperature, and other external factors can be minimized or controlled. Place the atomic clocks at various elevations and orientations within the controlled environment. Ensure that each clock is synchronized initially.

Data Collection: Record the time readings from each atomic clock simultaneously at regular intervals. Note the elevations and orientations of each clock relative to a reference frame

Data Analysis: Analyze the time discrepancies among the atomic clocks over time. Correlate the time differences with the elevations and orientations of the clocks. Identify any patterns or trends in the time variations with respect to changes in elevation or orientation. Compare the observed data with the predicted variations in Y0 field contours, orientation, and polarization as per CA.

Expected Outcomes: Correlation between time variations and changes in elevation or orientation, indicating the influence of Y0 field contours. Validation of CA predictions regarding the effects of gravitational fields on time measurements and Y0 field properties.

Conclusion: By conducting this experiment, we can gain insights into the Y0 field contours, orientation, and polarization and verify the predictions of CA. This experimental approach provides valuable evidence supporting the fundamental principles of CA and contributes to our understanding of space-time dynamics and gravitational effects.

Further Ideas to Test Charge Admittance Theory

Atomic clocks: One possibility is to use atomic clocks to measure the effects of gravity on time. A recent atomic resonance-based experiment by JILA in Colorado has already provided evidence supporting CA Theory. This experiment showed that the rate of atomic resonance changes slightly depending on their altitude, which is consistent with CA’s prediction that the Y0 field gradient varies with altitude.

Reflectionless Scattering Modes: A new method of understanding the areas of energy used to develop understanding of the CA Theory are the Reflectionless Scattering Modes (RSM), experiments being carried out by several scientific teams. RSM experiments involve creating a chamber in which the impedance of space is carefully controlled. This allows scientists to study how light waves interact with matter under different conditions. By observing how light waves are scattered and reflected, scientists can learn about the properties of the medium in which they are propagating.

CA postulates that energy is not a particle, mass or substance, but rather a property of space itself. According to CA, the admittance of space determines how energy is stored and transmitted. RSM experiments have the potential to provide direct evidence for this theory by measuring the impedance of space and observing its effects on light waves.

Transverse electromagnetic cells: Another possibility is to use transverse electromagnetic cells to measure the effects of varying Y0 fields. This could be done by measuring the speed of light over an open course at different distances, where the Y0 field gradient is expected to be different.

Laser ring gyros: Laser ring gyros are very sensitive to changes in the rotation of their frame of reference. CA predicts that laser ring gyros would experience a small but measurable rotation due to the Y0 field gradient.

Interferometry: In addition to these specific tests, there are a number of general areas where experiments could be piggybacked on existing and available equipment. For example, interferometry experiments, gravitational wave detectors, and precision measurement of the CMB radiation could all be used to indirectly infer the impedance or gradient of space. Spacecraft-based experiments could also be designed to directly measure the impedance or gradient of space in different regions of the universe.